Gonzo Futurist Manifesto & Metamodernism

I just ran across this and thought you all might find it inspirational.

The gonzo futurist is a super-empowered hopeful individual. She may have been a ‘graduate with no future’ (Mason, 2011), or the victim of public sector cuts, but has since grieved and moved on. She plays, tests, and play tests; making the best of the tools and technologies at her disposal. Comfortable calling on (and being called on by) her friends, peers, and tribe, her sense-making skills are social and connected. Her thinking may, occasionally, ‘be located inside the brains of other people.’ (Wheeler, 2011)

The gonzo futurist is a ‘deep generalist’ (Cascio, 2011) and ‘analytical polyglot’ (Smith, 2011). She has an ‘almost supernatural awareness of impacts and implications … [is] ready to adapt when necessary, building long-lasting systems when possible.’ (Cascio, 2011) Like Cayce Pollard, she is a ‘woman of affect, not of feeling (…) [an] empress of the amygdala.’ (Berlant)

The gonzo futurist is resilient. She works smart, not hard. She has one eye on the ‘adjacent possible’, switches codes, and contributes to the commons. She may be privileged, but has no time for competition, alpha male dick-waving, or beggar-thy-neighbour. Her success does not come at your expense.

Bombarded by stimuli, the gonzo futurist is an OODA cyborg. Observe, orient, decide, act.

Click to access gonzo-futurist-manifesto.pdf

 

Also a beautiful definition of metamodernism. Mmmmmm!

Van den Akker and Vermeulen define metamodernism as a continuous oscillation, a constant repositioning between positions and mindsets that are evocative of the modern and of the postmodern but are ultimately suggestive of another sensibility that is neither of them: one that negotiates between a yearning for universal truths on the one hand and an (a)political relativism on the other, between hope and doubt, sincerity and irony, knowingness and naivety, construction and deconstruction. They suggest that the metamodern attitude longs for another future, another metanarrative, whilst acknowledging that future or narrative might not exist, or materialize, or, if it does materialize, is inherently problematic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metamodernism

http://philosophynow.org/issues/58/The_Death_of_Postmodernism_And_Beyond

 

Inspiration Sources for Teams

Hey there! The mood-board presentations were amazing and I really wanted to give you guys a hand with artists examples and other sources that may help the creative juices to continue flowing as you work on creating your story boards.

CREATIVE PROCESS

Marilyn Minter 

I really liked the idea of creating visuals in a low-tech way. Either by using paint or milk and pigment or any other methods you guys can think of. While Minter’s work is not related to science, I thought that her play with materials and the visual effects that she produces may inspire you guys.

Lucy McRae

Lucy McRae considers herself to be a body architect, but her work has close ties to science and body-engineering. Here are a couple of videos you may enjoy and be inspired by.

 

PERCEPTION

MoMa Talk / Understanding and Sensing Images

This multidisciplinary series of discussions features prominent artists, art historians, scientists, conservators, and others as they provide a variety of perspectives on the complex process of experiencing art. Discussions explore the ways in which the perception of a single artwork evolves over time, how artists adopt optical and perceptive strategies as a means of influencing a particular sensorial experience, and the impact of recent scientific research and color theory on art and architecture.

http://www.moma.org/explore/multimedia/audios/17/257

 

UNEXPLORED MINDS

Bart Hess

I believe one of you guys mentioned that performance does not need to be live and that it can be acted out on camera. Based on the movies that you guys showed us an this last thought, I saw the work of Bart Hess as possible inspiration for you, which includes the use of performances, sound and lighting.

 

Everybody should watch this.

read more about this link here.

 

Neuroscience educational video library

Videos.

Learner.org neuroscience course –

“Exciting new developments in the field of neuroscience are leading to a new understanding of how the brain works that is beginning to transform how we teach in the classroom. Teachers are aware of these developments and are hungry for information that they can apply to their practice. One of the central goals of Neuroscience & the Classroom: Making Connections is to help teachers learn to use research to create their own solutions to their particular classroom challenges. Another important goal is to provide new and useful metaphors that we all can use to describe teaching and learning and that are grounded in modern neuroscience. Through this course, teachers learn to think critically about the field of Mind, Brain, and Education and thus learn to be informed consumers of information about brain science, better able to separate science from myth and misinterpretation.”

Poem by Mary Oliver – The Summer Day

The Summer Day

Who made the world?
Who made the swan, and the black bear?
Who made the grasshopper?
This grasshopper, I mean-
the one who has flung herself out of the grass,
the one who is eating sugar out of my hand,
who is moving her jaws back and forth instead of up and down-
who is gazing around with her enormous and complicated eyes.
Now she lifts her pale forearms and thoroughly washes her face.
Now she snaps her wings open, and floats away.
I don’t know exactly what a prayer is.
I do know how to pay attention, how to fall down
into the grass, how to kneel down in the grass,
how to be idle and blessed, how to stroll through the fields,
which is what I have been doing all day.
Tell me, what else should I have done?
Doesn’t everything die at last, and too soon?
Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life?

-Mary Oliver

from New and Selected Poems, 1992
Beacon Press, Boston, MA

Human Connectome Project | Mapping the human brain connectivity

Human Connectome Project | Mapping the human brain connectivity.

The Human Connectome Project
Navigate the brain in a way that was never before possible; fly through major brain pathways, compare essential circuits, zoom into a region to explore the cells that comprise it, and the functions that depend on it.

The Human Connectome Project aims to provide an unparalleled compilation of neural data, an interface to graphically navigate this data and the opportunity to achieve never before realized conclusions about the living human brain.

Yūgen

This is a rare but cherished visceral experience for me. Its given me footholds for many of my artworks.

Yūgen is a Japanese word pertaining to a profound awareness of the universe which evokes feelings that are inexplicably deep and too mysterious for words. The word itself is like an extension of awareness, the aesthetic perception which allows us to conceive of the vastness of the universe- but carries it beyond into an inconceivably mysterious realm. The feeling of Awareness is induced by confrontation to the brevity of life, and yugen is initiated from the awareness that even ‘aware’ itself is an ephemeral thing. Zeami Motokiyo’s description portrays a medium through which one may experience the unspeakably deep, stirring, feeling of yugen; “To watch the sun sink behind a flower clad hill. To wander on in a huge forest without thought of return. To stand upon the shore and gaze after a boat that disappears behind distant islands. To contemplate the flight of wild geese seen and lost among the clouds.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_aesthetics#cite_ref-10

http://pricklygoo.com/2010/04/13/yugen/

Book – Impro: Improvisation and the Theatre

Impro: Improvisation and the Theatre
by Keith Johnstone

This book has affected me in countless ways. Some quotes below.

“Imagination is as effortless as perception, unless we think it might be ‘wrong’, which is what our education encourages us to believe.”

“At school any spontaneous act was likely to get me into trouble. I learned never to act on impulse, and that whatever came into my mind first should be rejected in favour of better ideas. I learned that my imagination wasn’t ‘good’ enough. I learned that the first idea was unsatisfactory because it was (1) psychotic; (2) obscene; (3) unoriginal. The truth is that the best ideas are often psychotic, obscene and unoriginal.”

“Once you learn to accept offers, then accidents can no longer interrupt the action. […] This attitude makes for something really amazing in the theater. The actor who will accept anything that happens seems supernatural; it’s the most marvelous thing about improvisation: you are suddenly in contact with people who are unbounded, whose imagination seems to function without limit.”

“None of us really grow up. All we ever do is learn how to behave in public.”

Keith Johnstone’s involvement with the theatre began when George Devine and Tony Richardson, artistic directors of the Royal Court Theatre, commissioned a play from him. This was in 1956. A few years later he was himself Associate Artistic Director, working as a play-reader and director, in particular helping to run the Writers’ Group. The improvisatory techniques and exercises evolved there to foster spontaneity and narrative skills were developed further in the actors’ studio then in demonstrations to schools and colleges and ultimately in the founding of a company of performers, called The Theatre Machine.

Divided into four sections, ‘Status’, ‘Spontaneity’, ‘Narrative Skills’, and ‘Masks and Trance’, arranged more or less in the order a group might approach them, the book sets out the specific techniques and exercises which Johnstone has himself found most useful and most stimulating. The result is both an ideas book and a fascinating exploration of the nature of spontaneous creativity.